Image result for symptoms of appendicitis


How to know Symptoms of Appendicitis - Causes,Symptoms & Cure

Pressing on the appendix area, coughing or walking are Symptoms of Appendicitis and may all make the pain worse.
If you have appendicitis, you may also have other symptoms, including:
  • Feeling sick
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Constipation
  • Fever of 38ºC (100.4ºF) or more
  • Diarrhoea

When to get help: Immediately you notice any of the mentioned Symptoms of Appendicitis

If you're experiencing abdominal pain that's gradually getting worse, contact your GP or local out-of-hours service immediately.
Appendicitis can easily be confused with something else, such as bladder or urine infections, Crohn's disease, gastritis, intestinal infection and ovary problems. However, all conditions that cause constant stomach pain require urgent medical attention.
You should call 999 for an ambulance if you get a pain that suddenly becomes worse and spreads across your abdomen. These are signs that your appendix may have burst.
If the appendix bursts, it will release bacteria, which can cause serious infections, such as swelling of the inner lining of the abdomem (peritonitis) and blood poisoning.
Find out about the complications of appendicitis.
Abdomen
The abdomen is the part of the body between the chest and the hips.

Appendix
The appendix is a narrow muscular pocket in the abdomen that has no known function. It's attached to the large intestine.

Stomach
The sac-like organ of the digestive system. It helps digest food by churning it and mixing it with acids to break it down into smaller pieces.

Urinary system
The urinary system is made up of the kidneys, the ureters (the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder), the bladder and the urethra. The urethra is the tube through which we urinate.

It's not entirely clear what causes appendicitis.
The appendix is connected to the large intestine, where faeces are formed. It's located in the lower right-hand side of the abdomen (tummy).
Some cases of appendicitis are thought to be caused by a small piece of faeces getting trapped in your appendix. Bacteria in the appendix then start to multiply, causing it to fill up with pus and swell.
It's also thought that appendicitis may be caused by a stomach infection that has travelled to the appendix.
If the swollen appendix is not removed through surgery, it will eventually burst and the pus may infect other parts of your body.
Find out more about treating appendicitis.
This is dangerous as the bacteria can cause an infection in the abdomen (a condition called peritonitis) and an abscess.
Find out more about the complications of appendicitis.
Image result for symptoms of appendicitis

Abdomen
The abdomen is the part of the body between the chest and the hips.
Appendix
The appendix is a narrow muscular pocket in the abdomen that has no known function. It is attached to the large intestine.
Bacteria
Bacteria are tiny, single-celled organisms that live in the body. Some can cause illness and disease and some others are good for you.
Intestines
The intestines are the part of the digestive system between the stomach and the anus that digests and absorbs food and liquid.
Stomach
The sac-like organ of the digestive system. It helps digest food by churning it and mixing it with acids to break it down into smaller pieces.
Stool
Stool (also known as faeces) is the solid waste matter that is passed from the body as a bowel movement.


If you have appendicitis, your appendix will need to be removed by surgery.
Removal of the appendix (which doctors might call an appendectomy) is one of the most commonly performed operations, and its success rate is excellent.
It's not always easy to make a clear diagnosis. But if there's an outside chance that you have appendicitis, doctors tend to advise surgery rather than run the risk of the appendix bursting.

Keyhole surgery

A keyhole operation (medically known as laparoscopy) is usually carried out as the recovery is quicker compared to an open operation.
Three small cuts are made to remove the appendix. The advantage of keyhole surgery is that scarring is minimal and the recovery time is fast.
Most people can leave hospital a few days after the operation, although it may be one or two weeks before you fully recover.

Open surgery

In some circumstances, keyhole surgery isn't recommended. Open surgery will be performed instead.
These include:
  • cases where the appendix has burst
  • people who have tumours in their digestive system
  • women who are in the first trimester (up to week 13) of pregnancy
  • people who have previously had stomach surgery
In these cases, the operation will involve a single large cut to remove the appendix. Open surgery will leave a larger scar and it may be a week before you're well enough to leave hospital.
Both keyhole and open surgery are carried out under a general anaesthetic, which means that you're asleep throughout the operation.
Find out more about the symptoms of appendicitis.
Abdomen
The abdomen is the part of the body between the chest and the hips.
Antibiotics
Antibiotics are medicines that can be used to treat infections caused by micro-organisms, usually bacteria or fungi.
Appendix
The appendix is a narrow muscular pocket in the abdomen that has no known function. It is attached to the large intestine.
Inflammation
Inflammation is the body's response to infection, irritation or injury, which causes redness, swelling, pain and sometimes a feeling of heat in the affected area.

So there you have it How to know Symptoms of Appendicitis - Causes,Symptoms & Cure
Happy Reading!!!
 
Top